Archive | Blog
22
Jul

Time to Re-think Food Stamps

At the risk of being labeled a Tea Party toady or right-leaning deviationist, I have to ask if the severing of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps) from the Farm Bill by the Republican House Majority isn’t an opportunity worth taking advantage of. And in the same breath, I have […]

Continue Reading →
07
Jul

Food Rebels of Utica

I’ve always wondered what it takes to turn around a really down and out place. By which I mean the type of city where the only visible signs of prosperity are a well-lit McDonalds and half-full car wash. Some will say that the only hope rests with bold, inspired leadership by politicians or captains of […]

Continue Reading →
19
Jun

Food Coops: A Faith Renewed

“Faith is a stray pet that will somehow find you again.” David Hernandez, deceased poet. For the better part of 40 years, my fondest memory of retail food coops was the day they closed. Even though my heart was broken, the handwritten “Out of Bizness” sign hung from the ill-fated venture’s front door signaled the […]

Continue Reading →
05
Jun

We’re (They’re) Number One!

Ever since I abandoned my fair Connecticut for the browner pastures of New Mexico, I put more than miles between me and my former state. At times I found myself making fun of such inconsequential things as its puny size (some of New Mexico’s counties are larger than all of Connecticut), dense development and lack […]

Continue Reading →
19
May

UK Keen on Food Policy Councils

Imagine having nearly $2 million to spend over 3 years on the development and improvement of food policy councils in the United States. Mix in some capacity building assistance, a template for bringing together local food system stakeholders to write a food plan for your city or state, a national networking conference, and voila! Not […]

Continue Reading →
22
Apr

Food Democracy on the March

The most recent issue of the Harvard Health Policy Review has an article by me titled “Food Democracy on the March.” For those of you who have heard me speak or attended one of my food policy council trainings, some of the article’s references may sound familiar. But I thought it was time to organize […]

Continue Reading →
07
Apr

Genetically Engineered Food Needs Labels

The fight is underway in the Connecticut legislature to require labels on food items containing genetically engineered food. The bill has been reported out favorably by large margins in two committees.  My op-ed in favor of the bill appeared in the Sunday, 4/7/13 opinion section of the Hartford Courant. Use the link or read below: […]

Continue Reading →
15
Mar

Warriors, Workers, and Weavers: Choreographing the Food Policy Dance

I think it was the University of Wisconsin sociology professor Steve Stevenson who first coined the phrase “warriors, workers, and weavers” to characterize the three most common flavors that change agents come in. If it wasn’t him, I hope he’ll forgive the attribution because regardless of who first spoketh thus, I’ve yet to find a […]

Continue Reading →
16
Feb

Mark Winne and Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future Join Forces

Food Policy Advocate Mark Winne and The Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future to Collaborate on Food System Policy Work #AOLMsgPart_1_5ac6725f-3498-4132-b52d-083ac3ac1a6a td{color: black;}   Mark Winne has begun working with the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF) in the role of senior adviser. Mr. Winne, a noted expert on food policy councils, […]

Continue Reading →
26
Jan

Cooperating Our Way to a Better Food System

Authors’ note: It’s been a cold winter so far in New Mexico. A ski mountain just north of Santa Fe gave the country its coldest reading, 20 below, one day in early January. A few nights of sub-zero temperatures at lower elevations may have set back the bark beetles’ devastating march just enough to give some trees another year or […]

Continue Reading →